The glory days of Irish folk music/trad took place in O' Donoughues pub merrion row Dublin and Slatterys Capel Street seven nights a week. Pipers club James Street Dublin, Universal folk club coffee kitchen, Moleswoth street,  Foxrock Folk club where Luke Kelly used to perform with The Pavees. Irish folk music was everywhere in those days. Now we have punk cyber jazz indie. It won't work. You can't beat tradition. County Clare would not put up with all this punk dross.

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I really don't care much for Dublin. My favorite spots for trad have been the Dingle Peninsula in Kerry, Galway city, and the Connemara region of Galway. I saw some good musicians in Sligo as well. Dublin is too much of a "just trying to be like the rest of the world" city. I don't go to Ireland to hear the same crap that I can hear in 90% of the bars and clubs in the U.S. That's why the first thing I do when I land in Dublin is head straight for the west coast.

I grew up right outside of the city limits of Chicago, and the Chicago area has a huge percentage of people with Irish heritage, as well as a good number of Irish immigrants. So Irish pubs are popular, and Irish culture is celebrated here. Traditional Irish musicians here have told me that for a period of about 10 years - from the mid-90s to around 2005 - when Michael Flatley's "Riverdance" was really popular, there were sessions all over the city every night. The demand for trad musicians was so high that if you were an Irish trad musician you never had to worry about being out of work. Unfortunately, like all good things, it did come to an end and the work dried up. There are still many pubs in Chicago that hold trad sessions at least once a week, and the Irish American Heritage Center teaches Irish trad music and also holds a weekly session in their first floor pub, but nothing near the amount that there was during the "glory days", as trad musicians here refer to it.

I know some people look at things like "Riverdance" as a "plastic paddy" type thing, but it really did help stimulate interest in Irish music, and if it gets people wanting to go out and listen to Irish music and learn to play Irish music, then that can't be a bad thing, right?



Jason Fustar said:

I really don't care much for Dublin. My favorite spots for trad have been the Dingle Peninsula in Kerry, Galway city, and the Connemara region of Galway. I saw some good musicians in Sligo as well. Dublin is too much of a "just trying to be like the rest of the world" city. I don't go to Ireland to hear the same crap that I can hear in 90% of the bars and clubs in the U.S. That's why the first thing I do when I land in Dublin is head straight for the west coast.

I grew up right outside of the city limits of Chicago, and the Chicago area has a huge percentage of people with Irish heritage, as well as a good number of Irish immigrants. So Irish pubs are popular, and Irish culture is celebrated here. Traditional Irish musicians here have told me that for a period of about 10 years - from the mid-90s to around 2005 - when Michael Flatley's "Riverdance" was really popular, there were sessions all over the city every night. The demand for trad musicians was so high that if you were an Irish trad musician you never had to worry about being out of work. Unfortunately, like all good things, it did come to an end and the work dried up. There are still many pubs in Chicago that hold trad sessions at least once a week, and the Irish American Heritage Center teaches Irish trad music and also holds a weekly session in their first floor pub, but nothing near the amount that there was during the "glory days", as trad musicians here refer to it.

I know some people look at things like "Riverdance" as a "plastic paddy" type thing, but it really did help stimulate interest in Irish music, and if it gets people wanting to go out and listen to Irish music and learn to play Irish music, then that can't be a bad thing, right?

the Dubliners started playing in odonoughues famous bar in the world for irish music the greatest irish folk group ever to come out of Ireland seamus ennis played during the day for tourists from all over the world there is a road named after him in Dublin the pavees played in slatterys capel street Dublin the keenan family two furey brothers George and  paul guest artists matt molloy tony McMahon miko russel some of the greatest musicians played in this club the purist club is what they called it the pipers club had glorious sessions anybody who remembers these places reply I would love to hear from you sadly those days are gone now you have tony christiesinging irish folk songs with a group and the pogues  punk dross what next

irish folk/trad music is from Ireland the Clancy brothers were the first group to start irish folk music the Dubliners followed there are no rock instruments in these  groups try and do some research on irish folk/traditional it does not come from the usa or uk


professor moriarty said:

irish folk/trad music is from Ireland the Clancy brothers were the first group to start irish folk music the Dubliners followed there are no rock instruments in these  groups try and do some research on irish folk/traditional it does not come from the usa or uk

Where did I ever say that Irish folk/trad comes from the USA or UK? Also, where did I say that the Clancy Brothers and Dubliners used rock instruments? I never even mentioned those groups, yet I am well aware of them and own many of their albums.

What I said was that I don't care much for the PRESENT DAY music scene in Dublin, based on what I saw on my trips over there, and that I mostly preferred the west coast as far as the trad music scene goes. I also mentioned that there is an Irish music scene where I live (Chicago), and that there was once  a much more thriving scene here for Irish folk and trad in the mid-90s to mid-2000s. I never said that Irish folk or trad music originated in the USA or UK, and how the heck you twisted my words into that I can't even comprehend. Maybe you should work on your reading comprehension skills before rudely telling others to "try and do some research".



Jason Fustar said:


professor moriarty said:

irish folk/trad music is from Ireland the Clancy brothers were the first group to start irish folk music the Dubliners followed there are no rock instruments in these  groups try and do some research on irish folk/traditional it does not come from the usa or uk

Where did I ever say that Irish folk/trad comes from the USA or UK? Also, where did I say that the Clancy Brothers and Dubliners used rock instruments? I never even mentioned those groups, yet I am well aware of them and own many of their albums.

What I said was that I don't care much for the PRESENT DAY music scene in Dublin, based on what I saw on my trips over there, and that I mostly preferred the west coast as far as the trad music scene goes. I also mentioned that there is an Irish music scene where I live (Chicago), and that there was once  a much more thriving scene here for Irish folk and trad in the mid-90s to mid-2000s. I never said that Irish folk or trad music originated in the USA or UK, and how the heck you twisted my words into that I can't even comprehend. Maybe you should work on your reading comprehension skills before rudely telling others to "try and do some research".

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