Many of you will now be well aware that after 50 years the Dubliners have finally called it a day. Their final performance was on the BBC annual Hootenanny, hosted by Jools Holland on 31st December.  The loss of one of its founding members Barney McKenna in early 2012 was the final blow as he was the last of the original members.

Over the last number of decades they have always been there in the background from their heyday with Luke and Ronnie to their more recent incarnation and tour with new members. 

So it is worth adding a clip of their final show on Jools Holand and asking what impact they had on you over the last 50 years ? How did they influence you and your music?

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Wow.. HUGE impact i'd say! I heard them in the 60's and they were there all the time through my blues/boogie/rock/metal years.

Later in life "they" practically taught me to play whistle (i played along with a double CD of their greatest hits every day until i learned to play + picked up the songs and tunes.

Via them i discovered the bottomless well of traditional 'pure drop' Irish music, and still they were there, never forgotten. I even played Barneys brothers banjo once in Dublin back in 1995, so i'd definetly say they are one of my cornerstones in the music!

RIP Barney, Luke, Ciaran and Ronnie and all the best to the rest! And thanks for decades of great craic!

Ha....They were my "Founding Fathers"....Though Luke passed away long before my time, he is still my great example, his style of singing, his passion, the way he believed in what he sang, he can still amaze me, and bring shivers to my spine...And Ronnie and Chiarain, my travelcompanions for life...And Barney, good old Barney...hell, could he play...I had the good fortune to meet them a couple of years ago,albeit with Patsy as leadman.  I still cherish the memory...Yeah, the Dubs....part of my life they were...

cheers, Kees

Funny you should mention this Tony.  I was searching for something in the garage only last week when I unearthed the 25 Years Celebration Album, double cassette tape version!  That brought back some memories.  I can still manage a bar or two of "Saonika" and "The Sick Note" when called upon!!!



Paul Ivory said:

Funny you should mention this Tony.  I was searching for something in the garage only last week when I unearthed the 25 Years Celebration Album, double cassette tape version!  That brought back some memories.  I can still manage a bar or two of "Saonika" and "The Sick Note" when called upon!!!

Aye.. Salonika, The Sick note and perhaps My favorites, The Waterford boys and Bunch of red roses.

Salonika, of course, left out the 'l'!!

Paul Ivory said:

Funny you should mention this Tony.  I was searching for something in the garage only last week when I unearthed the 25 Years Celebration Album, double cassette tape version!  That brought back some memories.  I can still manage a bar or two of "Saonika" and "The Sick Note" when called upon!!!

They were the best act on the Jools Holland Hootenany, but I didn't realise it was there last performance. They will be a great loss to the Traditional music scene. The last time I saw them live was on the 28th march at the Sheffield City Hall in 2000.

 

I looks like they might not have quite finished yet, I have just found these tour dates online.

the dubliners played in o donoughues pub merrion row in dublin they played in the back room people like seamus ennis uillean piper luke kelly  gareth de brun  would frequent the place during the day some of the greatest sessions ever held were in the  revival of irish music in the 1970/1976 photos of everybody involved in irish  folk music are all on the walls sorry to hear about the dubliners finishing the greatest irishfolk group ever    mick moriarty irish world writer for irish folk/trad

Just saw a video of their 40th anniversary concert in The Gaiety, Dublin, and they basically have not changed since they started. Still a bit of musical anarchy, no real attempts to sound smooth, in time and well rehearsed; still giving the impression they were just having a few tunes and songs in O'Donohue's. That was a great part of their charm: they were always themselves, full of fun and never taking themselves too seriously. Their music had two main effects on me (and many others, it seems): it lifted the spirit and with a little practice it proved pefectly possible to actually play their songs! And onviously, as Lars has pointed out so eloquently, that opened the door to the vast treasure chamber of Irish traditional music. Would I ever have discovered Planxty and the Bothy Band, if it had not been for the Dubliners? Maybe, but definitely later, because hearing the Dubs and playing their stuff just made me go looking for more.

I suppose it is time for them to call it a day, as none of the founder members are with us anymore, but it feels like the end of an era. Thanks for all the good times, lads!

Simply....
The Dubliners opened the door and i opened my eyes, ears and heart...
What an awesome legacy!

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