So whats stopping us buying albums? Do you buy many albums or downloads? How many Facebook friends do you have and if your are a recording artist how many of your friends support you?  Following the recent Fund It campaigns by Irish groups Moxie and Leafzang I start to wonder. 

There are five members in the group Moxie.  They have 2,500 Facebook likes.  Each member is averaging about 1,500 Facebook friends so you could say, excluding joint friends they may have close to 5,000 friends in total. Of this a total of 153 supported their campaign.  This campaign succeeded.  Leafzang are a six member group, 400 liked their Facebook Page and they too could have 5,000 or more friends. A total of 44 people came out to support their campaign and as a result they failed to get funded.

This raises serious issues for artists. Not everyone can or should make it in this business.  As a community worldwide Irish musicians are a strong bunch.  Therefore you would think that more support would be forthcoming when Fund It opportunities arise.  If every one of Moxie and Leafzang's 10,000 joint friends supported one artist a year with a single €10 donation then 20 albums alone could be produced.  If we can afford our fancy iPhones and think nothing of throwing €10 over the bar for two pints why are we slow in purchasing albums or supporting these campaigns? 

Do we simply take the free offerings, the sound clips, the videos and satisfy ourselves with that?  How many albums did you buy in 2013? What's your take on it?

Views: 1069

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I haven't been counting, but have probably bought 12-15 Trad cds in the past year.  I LIKE cds! I am a bit old-fashioned in that respect, but my daughter (23 yrs) also likes owning cds, even though she transfers them to digital files for everyday use.  I have also supported one crowd-funded recording effort (not Trad, but quite folky), and got a cd in return.  I usually buy cds from Ebay or my local Trading website (usually new, but occasionally used), or at our local Irish Music Festival.  I don't live anywhere near where the sort of stuff I listen to is available - maybe that is also a reason people don't buy cds.  I really like the thrill of finding some obscure cd of a favourite Trad Band or artist, or taking a punt on an unknown and finding a gem.

I have exactly 599 albums in all (all music genres together). I keep buying them physical but i'll never buy digital even they are unreleased/bonus whatever tracks... Those digital music must be free for many reasons, my opinion. Now, when i see a certain label, one main distrib here that i won't name, with such killing prices for whatever cd's (old or new stuff, famous or not = same thing = kiling price), there yes, theres a problem for me and a big one... and i feel very limited.

I learn Tune's now, by Abc Noration then Internet, You-Tube etc,

and record it if I can. Or a mobile phone if I'm in a Session...

'' A sign of the time's perhap's '' 

?

jim,,,


I have to agree. The internet has changed a lot about the way we learn ... and share ... tunes.


Jim said:

I learn Tune's now, by Abc Noration then Internet, You-Tube etc,

and record it if I can. Or a mobile phone if I'm in a Session...

'' A sign of the time's perhap's '' 

?

jim,,,

I don't believe that was what Jim was implying, it's a combination of ABC notation, Youtube, Soundcloud, Spotify, Podcasts and more and more. To learn tunes you don't need to buy cds. I'm not saying that's a reason to not buy cds at all, but it's another reason why sales probably have gone down compared to 10 years ago. 

All good points to consider.  As a professional Irish harpist I have been thinking about this dilemma more and more as I prepare for a debut solo album.  I feel that if I expect folks to pay for "my" music, then it would help if I walked my talk and reciprocate whenever possible.  Nothing like good karma :).  So, when I feel financially comfortable to spend, I pay to attend whatever concerts I can, and purchase CDs etc.  When I'm not, I don't.  I make a practice of not burning CDs from friends, and even fellow musicians!, and was dismayed when I loaned a particular CD to another musician only to discover later that it had been burned onto their computer.  Never again.  I feel it is disrespectful to the musician and their work to pirate music, and want to maintain a sense of integrity when supporting fellow musicians.

That said, I was not aware until recently of the meager wages musicians earn from music/video streaming via Spotify & others.  Some surprising (to me) statistics from a recent article in Salon and a visual chart on how much musicians earn on-line has really provoked me to re-think my usage of Spotify, which I use mainly for listening to tunes to learn, and/or when bringing CDs/ipod with me is not a viable option.

While of a "younger" generation, I do enjoy the liner notes & images of a physical CD vs. a digitized electronic version of the same, and am more comfortable with a CD taking up a little space in my home vs. on my hard drive.  Now and then I will upload a purchased album onto some other kind of device (computer, ipod etc.), and I occasionally purchase mp3 versions of CDs when a physical one is unavailable through the internet market and hard to come by in the shops.  With the above articles in mind I want to experiment with allotting an amount in my budget on a regular basis for the option of a concert and/or CD so that I know the funds are there if and when I want to invest in the music of others and in sustaining the tradition itself.

I don't have or propose all of the answers or deem my practices perfect ~ just simply sharing where I am at.  It is interesting to hear others' perspectives and approaches as well.  I have not yet attempted to help fund a musician's crowd-funding campaign and am curious hearing thoughts from those who have some experience with this.

We have over the years bought many CD', cassettes before that.  We have a 30 gallon storage tub full to the top with CDs.  That said, we havent bought any new music in around 5 or 6 years, but for us it is more about our personal budget no longer allowing it. The cost of living seems like it goes up daily and just budgeting food is tough sometimes. Yes, we have the internet but no cable TV. The wife & I playing fiddles with a few beers is our recreation these days.

I have funded 4 CD projects in the past year via the internet. When the artist was performing, I made plans to see at least one show. Of course, the artists I supported are musicians that I enjoy as performers. It is a bit like when I was younger and bought Vinyl Albums of artists long ago in retail stores and then stood in long lines at ticketing agencies to get a ticket for their concert. The artists back then did not ask for monetary support to put the albums into our hands. Even so, I guess I supported them with my purchases. It is different now, but 25-30 years later I still attend concerts and still purchase music of artists I enjoy. I purchase 99% of music on CD. Last year I believe I purchased between 30-40 CDs. Logistically I deal with it as best I can as the sheer number of CD's I've collected over the years is a bit hard to store. I am partial to the CD but store my music on portable devices as I like to take it with me wherever I go.

I most likely will continue to fund CD projects of artists I enjoy as I learn of the ventures. I will always buy CDs as they are released in the music genres that I like. I guess I am old school with owning hard copies. my nieces and nephews have said that they have never purchased a CD. But they do use the Apple ITunes store for everything they listen to. Financial position, generational likes, internet, and even radio markets have given us different ways in which we the consumer think about how we support the artists we enjoy. I think that some people will buy CDs and most listeners will not. It's a tough call these days.
 
Aislinn Gagliardi said:

All good points to consider.  As a professional Irish harpist I have been thinking about this dilemma more and more as I prepare for a debut solo album.  I feel that if I expect folks to pay for "my" music, then it would help if I walked my talk and reciprocate whenever possible.  Nothing like good karma :).  So, when I feel financially comfortable to spend, I pay to attend whatever concerts I can, and purchase CDs etc.  When I'm not, I don't.  I make a practice of not burning CDs from friends, and even fellow musicians!, and was dismayed when I loaned a particular CD to another musician only to discover later that it had been burned onto their computer.  Never again.  I feel it is disrespectful to the musician and their work to pirate music, and want to maintain a sense of integrity when supporting fellow musicians.

That said, I was not aware until recently of the meager wages musicians earn from music/video streaming via Spotify & others.  Some surprising (to me) statistics from a recent article in Salon and a visual chart on how much musicians earn on-line has really provoked me to re-think my usage of Spotify, which I use mainly for listening to tunes to learn, and/or when bringing CDs/ipod with me is not a viable option.

While of a "younger" generation, I do enjoy the liner notes & images of a physical CD vs. a digitized electronic version of the same, and am more comfortable with a CD taking up a little space in my home vs. on my hard drive.  Now and then I will upload a purchased album onto some other kind of device (computer, ipod etc.), and I occasionally purchase mp3 versions of CDs when a physical one is unavailable through the internet market and hard to come by in the shops.  With the above articles in mind I want to experiment with allotting an amount in my budget on a regular basis for the option of a concert and/or CD so that I know the funds are there if and when I want to invest in the music of others and in sustaining the tradition itself.

I don't have or propose all of the answers or deem my practices perfect ~ just simply sharing where I am at.  It is interesting to hear others' perspectives and approaches as well.  I have not yet attempted to help fund a musician's crowd-funding campaign and am curious hearing thoughts from those who have some experience with this.

An oblique thought....MP3 COMPILATIONS AN IDEA TOO FAR?

In the early 2000s I was writing a folk column for the excellent  but now defunct Italian magazine Keltika, the mag always came packaged with an up to the minute Sampler CD, introducing new acts to a European audience.  I was asked to work on a CD of new Irish acts / bands playing Irish music, it was to be an innovative MP3 album, complete with a set of my own black and white photographs. The criteria was that it should feature own label artists who might benefit from the exposure it created.   This came out in 2003 as Imagine an Ireland.

At the time MP3 were mocked out of court in Ireland by some bands who were  worried that  their music would be degraded by the format. Then we hit a licensing problem, although you can fit dozens of tracks on a CD the  system of licensing means that there is a huge economic penalty  built into creating a  big sampler  in this format.

We eventually secured the licensing out of Milan not Dublin.  Now YouTube and the like have taken over the immediacy, which that MP3 CD was aiming for (concentrating as it did on  recent releases ) but the point was this was an essentially Curated Disc, it had the  ability to surprise the listener with stuff they might not know or might not have been looking for, very much like  radio that isn’t hampered by a playlist.   

We all gave our services for free, we had to clear copyright on all tracks  and  the images, very time consuming, the publisher took the hit on the disc manufacture and the necessary admin to clear all the ”legals “.

Sampler and compilation discs are still part of the music business and ARC in the UK has done some fine work with obscure and out of print material from the 1970s, but the potential for large MP3 collections on CDs is still limited by a licensing system that hasn’t been nifty at keeping pace with technology. 

Imagine an Ireland was a concept ahead of its time.

I think some artists are having trouble making the transitions to new available platforms...Many are too impatient or too untogether to wait for the CD to arrive from Custy's or wherever. It's so much easier to just click or download tracks from sites like bandcamp. It is no longer enough to have that CD alone, IMO.
I think some artists are having trouble making the transitions to new available platforms...Many are too impatient or too untogether to wait for the CD to arrive from Custy's or wherever. It's so much easier to just click or download tracks from sites like bandcamp. It is no longer enough to have that CD alone, IMO.

This is my first time posting, I generally just lurk in the background. I just wanted to add that I purchased Niamh's Cuz CD because I heard a set she posted on Soundcloud, the one starting with Knocknaboul, and then found album Cuz and purchased through the site. Without some tasters on free sites I'd never buy certain albums. 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2019   Created by Tradconnect Reviews.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

The title of your home page You could put your verification ID in a comment Or, in its own meta tag Or, as one of your keywords Your content is here. The verification ID will NOT be detected if you put it here. .slick-track { display: flex!important; justify-content: center; align-items: center;/* Safari */ display: -webkit-flex!important; -webkit-justify-content:center; -webkit-align-items: center; }