Hey Flute Players,

I want to get my first Irish flute and I need some guidance as to where and what type of Irish flute I should get.  I've played tin whistle for about 2 years and classical flute for 7 years --so I think I'm kind of familiar with how to play those. 

I was thinking of getting a delrin plastic flute. 

Any thoughts?

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I'm thinking I'll order a casey burns folk flute.  Now I just have to wait two months for it :)

I am anxiously waiting for my Forbes flute. I did a ton of flute research before ordering. I am buying the Forbes because it has a tapered inner bore to improve the intonation and sound. And the hard Delrin is supposed to mimic blackwood. And you don't have the maintenance of a wood flute. I also believe it is silly to make a modern 8 key flute that doesn't use the last two keys. Leave them off and save the weight. The last reason I want the Forbes flute is that it is made in 3 pieces, so the left and right hands can be positioned comfortably.

Dang it. Just checked my order status. Got another month or two to wait.

I learned on a Seery delrin flute.  It was easy to play and get a good tone out of it. 

If it isn't too late (or even if it is), I would like to put in a good word for Casey Burns' Folk Flute.  It costs about four hundred dollars and come in mopane, boxwood or blackwood.  I have one in blackwood that I have been playing for a couple of years and I  love it.  It takes air easily and can really honk and has great intonation and volume. 

Oh....Yeah.....good choice!

 

I just ordered a casey burns folk flute after a bit of research, seems like good value , but mostly i like the sound.

 

Depends on your budget and how you want to play ...a really good Radcliff, if you can get one will be well worth a look for someonw with a classical background 

I think delrin flutes are OK.  I would avoid M&E as the admittedly few I've seen have had serious intonation problems.  Also I would rnot ecommend Dixon for the same reasons. Des Seery makes very good keyless flutes in delrin and perfectly in tune.  Intonation is difficult enough without a dodgy flute!

I would recommend testing any flute before buying or getting an experienced player to test it also.  Having said that, I bought a keyless flute in african blackwood from Martin Doyle by  mail order  for my daughter and thought that the bottom D was not up to his usual standard.  He changed it for another with no quibbles.  His flutes are consistently good with excellent tone and volume.  They are not hard to blow, so great for beginners.  I own a Martin Doyle flute myself as well as a few older 8-key flutes but I used the Doyle to record my album.

Well Chris, it seems to me that since you bought a Doyle flute and it had to be returned due to a flat bottom D, then they are not "consistently good". Your experience with that dodgy one would certainly put me off buying one. :-) 

As for Delrin vs. blackwood or cocus, do you see Delrin as a serious contender, or is it mainly just for those on a limited budget who perhaps don't want to commit to a more expensive item?

Chris Corbett said:

I think delrin flutes are OK.  I would avoid M&E as the admittedly few I've seen have had serious intonation problems.  Also I would rnot ecommend Dixon for the same reasons. Des Seery makes very good keyless flutes in delrin and perfectly in tune.  Intonation is difficult enough without a dodgy flute!

I would recommend testing any flute before buying or getting an experienced player to test it also.  Having said that, I bought a keyless flute in african blackwood from Martin Doyle by  mail order  for my daughter and thought that the bottom D was not up to his usual standard.  He changed it for another with no quibbles.  His flutes are consistently good with excellent tone and volume.  They are not hard to blow, so great for beginners.  I own a Martin Doyle flute myself as well as a few older 8-key flutes but I used the Doyle to record my album.

No Mike, I have tried lots of other Doyle flutes.  Also everyone I've ever met with a Doyle flute has said how happy they are to have bought one.  The one I bought for my daughter was perfectly in tune. Most other people would have found the flute perfectly acceptable.  I just found that the bottom D was not as strong as my own Doyle.  When I saw Martin to get a replacement, I played about a dozen and they were all excellent.

As for Delrin, I haven't played that many Delrin flutes.  I have played one made by Desi Seery which I found to be excellent.  I don't think that the material a flute is made from is of paramount importance, as long as it is dense enough.  Ther are some differences in timbre but probably less than one would imagine.  I think that the smoothness of the bore is a far more important.  As long as a flute has been made with enough care and attention, I think that there will be little discernible difference delrin and wood.  You can buy a Dixon plastic flute for £80 or so.  It's just a shame that it's got holes in it otherwise it would do for plumbing.  A delrin flute is only likely to be cheaper because of the cost of the material.  If it's any good, the labour cost should be the same as a wooden one.  You get what you pay for in the end.  I would advise against trying to learn on a bad instrument, just because it's cheap.

Just curious.  Did you buy a Casey Burns flute and if so are you happy with it?  Don't leave us in suspense!

Nas Brain said:

I'm thinking I'll order a casey burns folk flute.  Now I just have to wait two months for it :)

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