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Trad Piano

A place for piano players in trad music to share videos, ideas and anything else.

Members: 17
Latest Activity: Aug 23

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Carl Hession Tunebook

Started by Francis Cunningham Aug 23. 0 Replies

Hi everyone,This may be of interest to those of you who are fans of Carl Hession.  A new album of 40 Carl compositions and accompanying tune book with all 40 tunes written in staff notation, ABCs and with chords. Available to buy now on bandcamp.…Continue

Piano accompaniment

Started by Caroline Locke May 26. 0 Replies

I meant:my style OF vamping.Oops,sorry...

Piano accompaniment

Started by Caroline Locke May 26. 0 Replies

My style if vamping is quite eclectic....I cannot compare my style with any other,really.

amplification for keyboards

Started by Carol Duffy. Last reply by Laurence Gray Dec 18, 2012. 3 Replies

Hi there :-)   Just wondering if anyone has used amplifier for sessions on keyboards?  I am seriously considering trying it but would like some advice on what type to use.  Most of the time the keyboard is loud enough, and I am always conscious of…Continue

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Comment by Carol Duffy on August 30, 2011 at 18:59
usually vamp in double octaves.  On slow airs etc often use synth string sound and slip-finger sustained chords - can be nice.  I find at times that the LH is what carries the pulse - esp for dancers - often think I have strained my wrist after a long session!
Comment by Bruce Evans on August 30, 2011 at 2:40

What do you do with your left hand when playing backup?

 

I tend to play root-five-root-five-r-f until it's time to move to the next chord when I might play a leading tone into the next root. I've heard several other pianists play a descending scale (8,7,6,5, etc.) Others play what would be a walking part to a string bass player. I am trying to work some of these other styles into my playing but it is so easy to fall back into the same ol' rut. 

Comment by Bruce Evans on August 23, 2011 at 23:30

Just found this one. There is a demo on YouTube. It seems that this is quite elementary.

http://www.captainfiddle.com/pianofirstdvd.html

 

Comment by Bruce Evans on August 23, 2011 at 22:48
What instructional material is available in video form for trad piano? I have a VHS tape by Tracey Dares which is specific on the Cape Breton style, but a search of Amazon.com and Homespun Tapes comes up blank for Irish Trad style instruction.
Comment by Bruce Evans on August 23, 2011 at 21:08

There are keyboards that play bass only. They are usually only about two octaves.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacksonpe/2819975602/

 

Comment by Charlie Pitchard on August 23, 2011 at 17:46

The Canadians back up fiddle tunes in very much the same style as on the banjo vid

Comment by Carol Duffy on August 23, 2011 at 17:43
Like the banjo one too - someone should develop a keyboard with bass only tho -
Comment by Carol Duffy on August 23, 2011 at 17:41
LOL  That is priceless!  The show must go on!  Lucky it fell flat  - and not on her toes!
Comment by Bruce Evans on August 23, 2011 at 10:56

Yes, this is about the dancing in the beginning, but be sure to watch it all the way through. THe good part is at 1:36.

https://www.facebook.com/video/video.php?v=10150252557456773

Comment by Carol Duffy on August 22, 2011 at 23:42
Hi :-)  I usually use a 5-octave yamaha keyboard for sessions - easier to sqeeze in to a group - most places dont have an acoustic piano.  Only problem I find is that it is not loud enough!  Usually end up transposing the whole thing down and octave and playing double octaves in the bass - can be quite a strain on the wrists :-)
 

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